Doghealth — How to get the best from your dog crate How to get the best from your dog crate – Doghealth
Login | Register Cart (0)

How to get the best from your dog crate

 

How to get the best from your dog crate

A dog crate makes housetraining easier. It provides your shy dog a refuge. It provides your traveling dog a measure of protection in a car accident. So rule 1 is to ensure that your dog likes his crate! You want to send a simple, clear message: good things happen to dogs inside their crates.

 

Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog's age, temperament and past experiences. It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps.

Crating caution

 

A crate is not a magical solution to common canine behaviour. If not used correctly, a dog can feel trapped and frustrated.

  • Never use the crate as a punishment. Your dog will come to fear it and refuse to enter.
  • Don't leave your dog in the crate too long. A dog that’s crated all day and night doesn't get enough exercise or human interaction and can become depressed or anxious. You may have to change your schedule, hire a pet sitter or take your dog to a day-care facility to reduce the amount of time they spend in their crate each day.
  • Puppies under six months of age shouldn't stay in a crate for more than three or four hours at a time. They can't control their bladders and bowels for that long. The same goes for adult dogs being housetrained. Physically, an older dog can hold it, but they don’t know they’re supposed to.
  • Crate your dog only until you can trust them not to destroy the house. After that, it should be a place they go voluntarily.
  • If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether they’re whining to be let out of the crate, or whether they need to be let outside to urinate.. If your dog is just testing you, they'll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at them or pounding on the crate will only make things worse.
  • If the whining continues after you've ignored them for several minutes, use the phrase they associate with going outside to urinate. If they respond and become excited, take them outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time.. Don't give in; if you do, you'll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what they want.
  • Separation anxiety.Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won't solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but they may get injured in an attempt to escape

 

The training process – train your dog to love his crate!

Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate

 

Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate, and any favourite toy. Bring them over to the crate and talk to them in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won't hit your dog and frighten them.

  • Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If they refuse to go all the way in at first, that's OK; don't force them to enter.

 

Step 2: Feed your dog meals in the crate

 

After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding them their regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate. If they remain reluctant to enter, put the dish only as far inside as they will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed them, place the dish a little further back in the crate.

Step 3: Practice with longer crating periods

 

After your dog is eating their regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine them there for short time periods while you're home.

  • Call them over to the crate and give them a treat.
  • Give them a command to enter, such as "kennel." Encourage them by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand.
  • After your dog enters the crate, praise them, give them the treat, and close the door.
  • Sit quietly near the crate for five to ten minutes, and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time, and then let them out of the crate.

Step 4: Crate your dog when you leave

 

After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving them crated for short periods when you leave the house.

  • Put them in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave them with a few safe toys in the crate.
  • Don't make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give them a treat for entering the crate, and then leave quietly.

When you return home, don't reward your dog for excited behaviour by responding to them in an enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low-key to avoid increasing their anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you're home so they doesn't associate crating with being left alone.

Step 4, Part B: Crate your dog at night

 

Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night, and you'll want to be able to hear your puppy when they whine to be let outside. Older dogs, too, should initially be kept nearby so they don't associate the crate with social isolation.

Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with the crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet.

 

 

 

Cart Summary

Your cart is empty
  • Doghealth De-Shedding Comb
    Doghealth De-Shedding Comb
    Doghealth De-Shedding Comb
  • Puppy feeding bowl
    Puppy feeding bowl
    Puppy feeding bowl
  • K6 - Giant 8ft x 4ft Best Selling Puppy Run
    K6 - Giant 8ft x 4ft Best Selling Puppy Run
    K6 - Giant 8ft x 4ft Best Selling Puppy Run
  • Puppy Runs - K700/K900
    Puppy Runs - K700/K900
    Puppy Runs - K700/K900
  • Mobility support Runaround
    Mobility support Runaround
    Mobility support Runaround
  • Gut problems Use Protect probiotic
    Gut problems Use Protect probiotic
    Gut problems Use Protect probiotic

Contact us

you can call us 10 - 4 Monday to Friday on 01760 726340 our email address is sales@doghealth.co.uk  

Read more →

From the Blog

Can dogs eat Banana's ??

Can dogs eat Banana's ??

25 March, 2020

Bananas can promote and help maintain healthy blood pressure. Bananas are rich in potassium and vitamin B6. These two nutrients can help regulate your dog’s blood flow. Low blood pressure equates to healthier heart function.

Read more →